Seen every show on Netflix? Couch have an imprint? Pyjamas all day/everyday wearing thin? Well you're not alone. We're a few weeks in and the days are starting to feel a little same-same. So why not use the time to get into some better health habits?

There's no pressure to throw yourself into a 'self-improvement journey', despite the endless fitness challenges on Instagram. But if you want to stay healthy while we're on standby, these apps should help you thrive. 


Make the most of what you've got. 

We all know it's important to keep supermarket runs to a minimum right now. So it's time to get creative with what you've got – a challenge made easier by the SuperCook App. It's packed with recipes catered to the ingredients you already have. Plus there's stacks of healthy options, so your pantry's your oyster. 

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Keep calm through cabin fever.

Between round the clock news updates and your flatmate's terrible taste in music, it's important to tune out from time to time. Whether you've tried it yourself or not, you've probably heard that meditation is a great way of easing anxiety. And with apps like Headspace and Calm, getting into 'the zone' has never been easier. 

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Mind your meals.

My Fitness Pal not only counts your calorie intake, it also breaks down the micros of the food you eat – so you know you're getting your essential vitamins and minerals. And if you're a visual person why not try food journaling? The See How You Eat App gives you a snapshot view of what you're eating day to day, to keep you on track. 

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Get fit on demand.

Whether your goal is to get fit or avoid the 'quarantine-fifteen,' there are loads of gyms launching online workouts for lockdown. Even if you're on a budget, YouTube has stacks to help you feel the burn, relax and let go, or dance up a sweat. Or try Les Mills on Demand for free with TVNZ. 

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Take up a healthy hobby.

Exercising within our 5km bubble is one of the only justifiable ways of getting out of the house. So if you want to get into running, walking or cycling, the Human App can help you stay motivated, track your progress and guide you every step of the way. And of course, make sure you stay two metres away from others. 

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Feed your brain. 

If you're after something worth reading that's not on Facebook, look no further. We're giving you exclusive access to Synergy, our online health and wellbeing portal, a bank of blogs, recipes, reviews and so much more. There's stacks of good content covering all sorts of topics. Whatever you're passionate about, you'll find it here

Simply sign up with your Member number and you're good to go, or register your interest here and we'll get you sorted. 

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Despite the lockdown, hopefully you got to indulge over Easter. But it's a slippery slope and soon enough we all wake up surrounded by empty wrappers with Netflix on screen asking, "are you still watching?" So if you're wanting to get into some better habits, these apps are a good palce to start. But if you don't, that's cool too. It's your lockdown, do it your way. 

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